Turn-to, Fourth Generation

Charles Hatton did not write a “profile” per se of Turn-to (because Turn-to was not a champion). Hatton did write a little about Turn-to in the 1955 American Racing Manual, in the section on “Review of 1954 Races.” Here is what Hatton had to say:

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When, in January of ’54, the late John Blanks Campbell issued his last set of Experimental handicap weights, these indicating the veteran official’s opinion of the generation’s juvenile performances together with his judgment of future capabilities, Cain Hoy Stable’s Royal Charger colt, Turn-to, winner of the Garden State Futurity, and Llangollen’s Porterhouse, victor in the Belmont Futurity, were tied for top place, Campbell assigning each of them scale weight, or “par for the course,” 126 pounds. The old master thus expressed his warm admiration for both young thoroughbreds, but a little later in Florida he confided to an interviewer that he believed Turn-to gave somewhat more promise of developing into a top three-year-old during the course of the season about to unfold than did the Virginia-bred son of the imported South American sire, Endeavour II.

As it turned out, both of Campbell’s choices were unlucky, although Turn-to, in winning impressively Hialeah’s Flamingo Stakes, run in February, did come nearer to justifying his great early promise than did little Porterhouse, a complete failure in his stakes engagements and successful only in two outings at sprint distances.

Turn-to Form Stylist

In retrospect, Turn-to’s Flamingo was notable not so much for the quality of those he defeated in the nine-furlong test as for the excellent style revealed by the winner during the running, style that left no doubt as to his potentialities at this and longer routes. . . .

As in the Garden State the previous October, Turn-to was a forward factor from the start of the Flamingo. . . . Turn-to allowed his stablemate, Giant Cracker, to set a glib pace for a half mile, then took over command and never relinquished a good lead, Maine Chance Farm’s Black Metal and Greentree’s Maharajah taking the place and show awards without ever menacing the winner, whose time of 1:49 2/5 was excellent. . . .

Sad as it is to relate, that was the last seen in public of Turn-to [who bowed a tendon and was retired to stud, where he did fulfill his potentialities].

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So let us now examine Turn-to as a name in more current pedigrees, specifically in the fourth generation of all weanlings, yearlings, or two-year-olds sold at public auction in North America in 1999-2002.

Turn-to showed 6,155 times in the fourth generation of these 54,000+ foals, ranking him 11th in overall popularity.

At P1 in the fourth generation (the male line) Turn-to had a Price Index of 1.40 (second among these 20 sires) and a PPI (result) of 1.36 (also second), pretty close to right on the money. He had 2,190 foals at P1, including 89 stakes winners (4.06%), including seven with 2,000+ Performance Points: Ashado (7,931), Saint Liam (6,357), Singletary (3,454), Southern Image (3,144), Starrer (2,843), Kicken Kris (2,627), and Kris Kin (2,242).

Ashado and Saint Liam were both by Saint Ballado, by Halo, by Hail to Reason, by Turn-to. Kicken Kris and Kris Kin were both by Kris S., by Roberto, by Hail to Reason. Starrer was by Dynaformer, by Roberto. Southern Image was by Halo’s Image, by Halo, by Hail to Reason. Singletary was by Sultry Sun, by Cox’s Ridge, by Best Turn, by Turn-to. So all but Singletary trace to Turn-to in the male line through Hail to Reason. Three of the six were by sons of Roberto.

At P2 in the fourth generation Turn-to had a Price Index of 1.55 (second) and a PPI (result) of 1.99 (also second), a good improvement in absolute terms. He had 155 foals at P2, including ten stakes winners (6.45%), including Farda Amiga (2,082). Farda Amiga was by Broad Brush, who was inbred 3×3 to Turn-to. Anything by Broad Brush has Turn-to at P2 and P4 in the fourth generation.

So let us skip to P4. At P4 in the fourth generation Turn-to had a Price Index of 1.28 (first) and a PPI (result) of 1.32 (fourth), not as good as P2. He had 353 foals at P4, including 18 stakes winners (5.10%), including the aforementioned (which is pronounced a-fore-men-tioned, contrary to what you hear on TVG) Farda Amiga.

At P3 in the fourth generation Turn-to had a Price Index of 0.55 (20th) and a PPI (result) of 0.92 (11th), a dramatic improvement on both scores although still below average (1.00). He had 450 foals at P3, including 14 stakes winners (3.11%), including Tour of the Cat (2,507). Tour of the Cat was by Tour d’Or (by Medaille d’Or out of Debby’s Turn, by Turn to Mars, by Turn-to).

At P5 in the fourth generation Turn-to had a Price Index of 1.00 (seventh) and a PPI (result) of 0.96 (11th), a slight decline on both scores. He had 1,636 foals at P5, including 57 stakes winners (3.48%), including Orientate (3,617), Lion Heart (2,591), and One for Rose (2,521).

Orientate was by Mt. Livermore out of Dream Team, by the aforementioned Cox’s Ridge. Lion Heart was by Tale of the Cat out of Satin Sunrise, by Mr. Leader, by Hail to Reason. One for Rose was by Tejano Run out of Saucyladygaylord, by Lord Gaylord, by Sir Gaylord, by Turn-to.

At P6 in the fourth generation Turn-to had a Price Index of 0.82 (17th) and a PPI (result) of 0.56 (19th), not good on either score. He had 241 foals at P6, including seven stakes winners (2.90%), but none with 2,000+ Performance Points.

At P7 in the fourth generation Turn-to had a Price Index of 0.98 (15th) and a PPI (result) of 0.81 (14th), a mixed result. He had 846 foals at P7, including 29 stakes winners (3.43%), including Cajun Beat (2,259) and Two Item Limit (2,061). The second dam of Cajun Beat was Thundertee, by Ye, by Turn-to. The second dam of Two Item Limit was Saratoga Fleet, by Sir Gaylord.

At P8 in the fourth generation Turn-to had a Price Index of 1.11 (tenth) and a PPI (result) of 1.07 (eighth), an improvement in relative terms but not in absolute terms. He had 284 foals at P8, including 16 stakes winners (5.63%), but none with 2,000+ Performance Points.

Overall, counting all eight positions in the fourth generation, Turn-to had a Price Index of 1.13 (third) and a PPI (result) of 1.12 (seventh), almost right on the money except for the drop in rank from third to seventh. He had 6,155 foals overall, including 240 stakes winners (3.90%).

Almost 17% (1,033) of those 6,155 foals involved daughters of Turn-to in the third generation. Those 1,033 foals had a Price Index of 1.17 and a PPI (result) of 1.17. The remaining 5,122 foals involved sons of Turn-to in the third generation. Those 5,122 foals had a Price Index of 1.13 and a PPI (result) of 1.11. So there was very little difference by sex in either prices or results.

Almost 26% (1,599) of these 6,155 foals were by sons of Halo or Roberto. Those 1,599 foals had a Price Index of 1.62 and a PPI (result) of 1.72. The remaining 4,556 foals had a Price Index of 0.96 and a PPI (result) of 0.90. The former group were NOT cheap but DID improve upon their prices. The latter group WERE cheap but did NOT improve upon their prices.

To recapitulate, there were not many surprises at all in this analysis of Turn-to. He had an overall Price Index of 1.13 and and overall result of 1.12. That about says it all. Very few differences were observed by sex in either prices or results. The biggest difference was among the 1,599 foals by sons of Halo or Roberto. That group was NOT cheap but DID improve upon its prices. All others WERE cheap but did NOT improve upon their prices.

With Halo and Roberto in the second generation, Hail to Reason, Halo and Roberto in the third generation, and Sir Gaylord in the fourth generation among these most popular sires, Turn-to was obviously quite “influential.” As for “valuable” though, his overall Price Index of 1.13 and PPI (result) of 1.12 says it all. After four generations many of the best sires are “value neutral” (or worse), and Turn-to was no exception.

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