Ribot, Fourth Generation

As a general introduction to Ribot the racehorse I will now repeat what Charles Hatton wrote about him in the 1970 American Racing Manual, while discussing 1969 Horse of the Year Arts and Letters.

Sire Ribot Inherits Hyperion’s Mantle

Arts and Letters’ sire, Ribot, needs no introduction as he long since has established himself as the world’s most reliable source of classicists, inheriting the mantle of that gay, puckish little horse Hyperion.

It is the irony of Federico Tesio’s career of about 60 years of breeding and racing thoroughbreds that he did live to see Ribot realize his ambitions. “I don’t want just a good racehorse,” he said. “What I want is a superhorse.” He wished to create a Nietzschean prototype, a Wagnerian divine animal, a Carlylean hero of the turf. He always smiled politely when other owners told him happily they had a colt who someday would win some Italian purse. Those were provincial ideals, not worth wasting one’s live on. The only goals were the big races in France and England, where the best in Europe met. He wanted to win them not in a dramatic photo finish, but easily and comfortably, with a horse that could run ahead like a whippet in front of a pack of terriers.

The unbeaten Italian won two Arcs and a King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, this last through sheer nerve and class, as he could gain no acceptable traction in the boggy going. Most Ribots are “on the small side,” and yet they seem nearly indefatigable, though few have quite exhibited Arts and Letters’ bottom when they attempted two hard races too close together.

Ribot is perhaps 15.3, but his chest development required a specially tailored girth. His outside lung capacity supplies the heart with extraordinary quantities of oxygen and, as happens with leading human distance runners, his heart beat is low, 35 to the minute, 85-90 after a race of 9 furlongs. He reaches a fatigue point considerably later than most horses. It is something of a systemic phenomenon that Ribot and most of his progeny seem to host few worms.

Ribot is himself lengthier of back and flank than is Arts and Letters, but they have the same superb running gear. . . .

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Now let us turn our attention to Ribot as a name in more current pedigrees, specifically in the fourth generation of all weanlings, yearlings, and two-year-olds sold at public auction in North America in 1999-2002.

Ribot appeared 4,961 times among these 54,000+ foals, ranking him 15th among these 20 sires in overall popularity.

At P1 in the fourth generation (the male line) Ribot had a Price Index of 0.64 (15th among these 20 sires) and a PPI (result) of 0.97 (11th), a good improvement on both scores. He had 818 foals at P1, including 28 stakes winners (3.42%), including Premium Tap (3,469 Performance Points). Premium Tap was by Pleasant Tap, by Pleasant Colony, by His Majesty, by Ribot.

At P2 in the fourth generation Ribot had a Price Index of 0.48 (16th) and a PPI (result) of 0.35 (15th), a mixed and not particularly good result. He had 98 foals at P2, including two stakes winners (2.04%), but n0ne with 2,000+ Performance Points.

At P3 in the fourth generation Ribot had a Price Index of 0.91 (tenth) and a PPI (result) of 1.21 (second), an excellent improvement on both scores. He had 1,137 foals at P3, including 56 stakes winners (4.93%), including Starrer (2,843) and Honor in War (2,265). Starrer was by Dynaformer (Roberto out of Andover Way, by His Majesty). Honor in War was by Lord At War (by General out of Luna de Miel, by Con Brio II, by Ribot).

At P4 in the fourth generation Ribot had a Price Index of 0.47 (16th) and a PPI (result) of 0.09 (20th), a pretty dismal result. He had 149 foals at P4, including one stakes winner (0.67%) with 308 Performance Points.

At P5 in the fourth generation Ribot had a Price Index of 1.02 (fifth) and a PPI (result) of 1.11 (seventh), a mixed result. He had 1,033 foals at P5, including 35 stakes winners (3.35%), including Adoration (3,951), Imperial Gesture (2,219), and Farda Amiga (2,082). Adoration was out of a mare by Key to the Mint, by Graustark, by Ribot. Imperial Gesture was out a mare by Hoist the Flag, by Tom Rolfe, by Ribot. Farda Amiga was out of a mare by Pleasant Colony.

At P6 in the fourth generation Ribot had a Price Index of 0.92 (11th) and a PPI (result) of 0.88 (13th), a slight regression on both scores. He had 419 foals at P6, including 12 stakes winners (2.86%), none with 2,000+ Performance Points.

At P7 in the fourth generation Ribot had a Price Index of 1.03 (12th) and a PPI (result) of 0.80 (15th), a regression on both scores. He had 1,087 foals at P7, including 33 stakes winners (3.04%), including Lost in the Fog (3,078) and Offlee Wild (2,076). The second dam of Lost in the Fog was Wistful, by Maribeau, by Ribot. The second dam of Offlee Wild was Andover Way (by His Majesty), the dam of Dynaformer, as previously mentioned.

At P8 in the fourth generation Ribot had a Prince Index of 1.10 (11th) and a PPI (result) of 1.76 (second), an excellent improvement on both scores. He had 220 foals at P8, including 11 stakes winners (5%), including Strut the Stage (3,369). The third dam of Strut the Stage was Myrtlewood Lass, by Ribot.

Overall, taking all eight positions into account, Ribot had a Price Index of 0.90 (19th) and a PPI (result) of 1.01 (12th), a pretty good improvement on both scores. He had 4,961 foals overall, including 178 stakes winners (3.59%).

Not quite 18% (886) of these 4,961 foals involved daughters of Ribot in the third generation. Those 886 foals had a Price Index of 0.84 and a PPI (result) of 0.91. The remaining 4,075 foals involving sons of Ribot in the third generation had a Price Index of 0.92 and a PPI (result) of 1.03. So the fillies were cheaper, but both sexes outperformed their prices.

Ribot did not have any sons among the top 20 in the third generation. His Majesty just missed the top 20 and probably accounts for about a third of these 4,961 foals.

To recapitulate, Ribot’s fillies in the third generation were cheaper than his colts in the third generation, but both sexes out performed their prices. With an overall Price Index of 0.90 and an overall PPI (result) of 1.01, Ribot was indeed “valuable” in the fourth generation, although 1.01 is just a hair above average (1.00).

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